Cigar Reviews and Ratings at Cigar Inspector Your source for cigar reviews and ratings 2017-12-13T14:14:57Z http://www.cigarinspector.com/feed/atom Beneluxor <![CDATA[Cigar Review – CAO Brazilia Piranha]]> http://www.cigarinspector.com/?p=18018 2017-12-13T14:14:57Z 2017-12-13T14:14:09Z Origin : Nicaragua Format : Robusto Size : 4 1/2" x 46 ring gauge (114mm x 18.26mm) Wrapper : Brazil Bahia Filler : Nicaragua Binder : Nicaragua Hand-Made Price : ~ € 7,00 / $ 8.40 eachMore info about purchasing CAO Flathead... Draw : 3 out of 6 stars Burn : 4 out of 6 […]

Cigar Review – CAO Brazilia Piranha

Post from CigarInspector.com

CigarStash.com - the ultimate cigars shopping tool!

]]>

Origin : Nicaragua
CAO CigarsFormat : Robusto
Size : 4 1/2" x 46 ring gauge (114mm x 18.26mm)
Wrapper : Brazil Bahia
Filler : Nicaragua
Binder : Nicaragua
Hand-Made
Price : ~ € 7,00 / $ 8.40 each
More info about purchasing CAO Flathead...

Draw : 3 out of 6 stars
Burn : 4 out of 6 stars
Flavour : 4 out of 6 stars
Aroma : 6 out of 6 stars
Strength : 4 out of 6 stars

Introduction
The CAO Brazilia Piranha is a satisfying, slow-burning, short thick corona, with a pleasing, full-bodied, tho not varied flavour, marrying the sweetness of a very dark Brazil Bahia wrapper, with heady Nicaraguan binder & filler tobacco.

CAO cigars take their brand name from the initials of the company's founder, Cano Aret Ozgener, born to Armenian-heritage parents in Istanbul, Turkey, Ozgener later moving to Nashville, Tennessee, USA where the company began.

Tasting

A striking cigar in appearance, its very black Brazilian wrapper signalling to us Brazil tobacco fans that there is likely some of the famous Brasil tobacco natural sweetness to be enjoyed here. An interesting vitola too, in the classic 'corona gorda' 46 ring gauge, most always rolled in quite long cigars, but here in a nice compact 4 1/2" (114mm) package. In a nice bow to its Brazilian character, the colourful CAO Brazilia cigar band declares 'Feito à mão' - 'Made by hand' - in Portuguese.

Packaged in cellophane, the cigar seemed a bit over-firm at first, but a few days to mellow in the humidor with cellophane removed, readied it for a smoke. Wrapper not super-smooth, and not as oily to the touch as one might expect in this stick, but very clearly Brazil.
The aroma of this cigar was exceptionally delicious both before and after lighting. During the smoke one had the feeling of being at a ski lodge in front of a warm wood fire, with a pot of melted caramel simmering nearby.

Pre-draw brings the taste of cocoa to the lips, pleasing those of us who have a tobacco sweet-tooth. It does surprise me that these cocoa-caramel-hinting Brasil cigar wrappers, are not even more popular in the cigar world.

The oily Brasil cigar wrappers are noted for sometimes having burn problems, and this was one of those sticks where that occurred, complicated by a stick just a bit too tightly rolled in part, so the first 10 minutes were a real battle here. Initial draw was very tight, to the point I had to use the cigar-piercing tool I keep handy for the narrow-vitola hand-rolled Cubans. Burn at first was wildly irregular, needing some touch-ups, and there was at first much less flavour than I expected.

But after 10 minutes, the crisis was over, a big puff of smoke signalled a better draw, and the burn became beautifully regular, remaining so until the end. Nice white-grey ash, and one of the slowest-burning sticks I have smoked in a while, too.

Initial flavour was that of cocoa matched with some woodiness. As the initial draw and burn problems subsided, there was more of a sense of a wood fire going, co-ordinate with the sweetness, and that remained the dominant sense throughout. Tho the flavour was satisfying, it did not vary much. There was an initial burst of spice and pepper notes after the draw eased, and an occasional mild return of spice afterwards; and a bit of coffee and nuts in the final third before harshness set in at the nub. Some slight harshness also showed up in the middle, nothing major.

But very attractively, the pleasing if simple flavour combination, felt very full-bodied. The cigar was also reasonably heady and medium-strong, strength on the level of a Montecristo firing on all cylinders, tho with a less-sophisticated and simpler flavour palette. One interesting thing I could do during the smoke, was dial the flavour level versus headiness up-and-down. A gentle puff and I got more sweet flavour, like drinking hot chocolate in front of a fire ... a stronger puff and there was a bit less flavour but much more headiness, that stronger-cigar feeling.

A natural comparison of the CAO Brazilia Piranha, is to the comparably-priced, also hand-rolled long-filler, thinner but longer (37 x 139mm), Balmoral Royal Maduro Panatela, also with a Brasil Bahia wrapper, but with Dominican & Brazilian filler and Dominican binder, giving it a very different character. In the Balmoral Royal, the Brasil-Dominican tobacco combination gives a little more of a subtle and sophisticated and milder smoke, whereas the CAO Brazilia has less subtlety but more strength and headiness.

For me - admittedly biased in favour of slender sticks generally - I would give the nod to the subtler Balmoral, tho I understand many would prefer the CAO Brazilia with its more potent, even if simpler, profile. The CAO Brazilia seems to have what I often see in cigars designed for the USA market - a bit more of in-your-face cigar flavour that is consistent, but this extra flavour overwhelming the sense of progression and subtlety some of us in enjoy in Cuban sticks, or more European-designed hand-rolled cigars such as those from Davidoff or Balmoral.

You might be interested in these articles too:

Cigar Review – CAO Brazilia Piranha

Post from CigarInspector.com

CigarStash.com - the ultimate cigars shopping tool!

]]>
1
Beneluxor <![CDATA[Cigar Review – Camacho Corona Machito]]> http://www.cigarinspector.com/?p=18012 2017-12-05T12:53:59Z 2017-12-05T12:52:55Z Origin : Honduras Format : Petit Panetela Size : 4" x 32 ring gauge (102mm x 12,70mm) Origin : Honduras Hand-Made Price : ~ € 3,30 / $ 4.00 eachMore info about purchasing Camacho Corojo cigars... Draw : 5 out of 6 stars Burn : 4 out of 6 stars Flavour : 4 out of […]

Cigar Review – Camacho Corona Machito

Post from CigarInspector.com

CigarStash.com - the ultimate cigars shopping tool!

]]>

CamachoOrigin : Honduras
Format : Petit Panetela
Size : 4" x 32 ring gauge (102mm x 12,70mm)
Origin : Honduras
Hand-Made
Price : ~ € 3,30 / $ 4.00 each
More info about purchasing Camacho Corojo cigars...

Draw : 5 out of 6 stars
Burn : 4 out of 6 stars
Flavour : 4 out of 6 stars
Aroma : 3 out of 6 stars
Strength : 3 out of 6 stars

Introduction

The Camacho Corojo Machito is a small, fully long-filler, hand-rolled Honduran cigar, offering rich flavour and great value for the modest price, if not quite the depth of more expensive sticks.

The brand takes its name from Simon Camacho, the company's 1960s founder. 'Corojo' is the name of a legendary Cuban tobacco wrapper leaf, no longer cultivated there in its 'pure' form due to disease vulnerability, the Corojo-seed leaves in Honduras being the defining tobacco of this all-Honduran cigar.

'Machito' is the term used by Camacho for these petit panetelas, a word often meaning 'riding high' or 'well-placed'. Typically sold in tins of 6 cigars, the Davidoff stores - Camacho is now a part of Oettinger-Davidoff - sometimes also sell these Machitos individually.

Tasting

The cigar as a whole seems slightly thicker than its official 32 ring gauge, comparing more with the 33-34 ring gauge cigars in my humidor. Wrapper is smooth and pleasant to the touch, tho with some quite different colour patches affecting the appearance, especially once that too-wide cigar band is slipped off.

Pre-draw after punching is delightful, with spice & sweet citrus, tho I am surprised afterwards in that there is not so much spice in actually smoking the stick.

With lighting, lots of flavour is immediately on the scene, giving the sense that this cigar is a great bargain. Citrus with nuts and a wood fire in the first few minutes, then just mostly sweet citrus and the woodiness, with an occasional touch of a barbecue flavour. Draw is great, tho the first half burns a bit too quickly, reversing the usual image of Corojos as rather burn-resistant.

The middle third begins with glorious flavour richness and a sense of a full-bodied cigar, belying the slender ring gauge. This is the real sweet spot of the cigar, which alas burns away too quickly. As the mid-point of the cigar begins, the flavour shifts to a somewhat darker tone, bitter tho not unpleasant, as if one is tasting the pits of fruit, or the walnut shell instead of the walnut.

That bitter-but-ok tone fades as the final third begins, and now a pleasant nutty flavour begins to dominate, a little bit of the citrus fruitiness also nudging in now and then.

Remained quite good getting down to the nub, but I couldn't resist cutting it open to verify this really was a long-filler cigar, and indeed it was, lovely wrapped filler leaves there to be seen.

Ash was a nice grayish white, holding for a half-inch or so, ok for a slender cigar like this.

A very nice short smoke for the price, lots of flavour and interest thru the smoke. But in some ways this small Machito hit me as a bit of a candy-store cigar, lots of flavour there, maybe not the depth I would find in more sophisticated (& expensive) smokes. The Camacho Corojo did not seem particularly strong in this small package, it's a good way to get introduced to this rich flavour palette.

It's common for cigar makers now to offer their shortest cigar like this as a panetela, but my thought is somewhat the opposite ... do a 4 to 4.5 inch cigar as a short corona, and then do a 5 or 5.5 inch panetela as well as a longer corona ... a 34 to 38 ring panetela thickness is a great way to have a longer but lighter smoke, and a very elegant cigar appearance-wise, whilst short sticks satisfy more if a little thicker.

You might be interested in these articles too:

Cigar Review – Camacho Corona Machito

Post from CigarInspector.com

CigarStash.com - the ultimate cigars shopping tool!

]]>
1
Beneluxor <![CDATA[Cigar Review – La Gloria Cuban Medaille d’Or No.4]]> http://www.cigarinspector.com/?p=18009 2017-12-04T20:48:19Z 2017-12-04T20:44:26Z Origin : Cuba Format : Palmitas - slender long panetela Size : 6" x 32 ring gauge (152mm x 12.70mm) Ring : 32 Box Year : 2013 Hand-Made Price : $13+More info about purchasing Gloria Cubana cigars... Draw : 3 out of 6 stars Burn : 4 out of 6 stars Flavour : 4 out […]

Cigar Review – La Gloria Cuban Medaille d’Or No.4

Post from CigarInspector.com

CigarStash.com - the ultimate cigars shopping tool!

]]>

Origin : CubaLa Gloria Cubana
Format : Palmitas - slender long panetela
Size : 6" x 32 ring gauge (152mm x 12.70mm)
Ring : 32
Box Year : 2013
Hand-Made
Price : $13+
More info about purchasing Gloria Cubana cigars...

Draw : 3 out of 6 stars
Burn : 4 out of 6 stars
Flavour : 4 out of 6 stars
Aroma : 5 out of 6 stars
Strength : 4 out of 6 stars

Introduction

A charming anachronism in today's thicker cigar world, the Médaille d'Or No 4 from La Gloria Cubana, is an attractive slender stick offering some unique sweet taste notes amidst its tight draw, this 2013 aged-in-Cuba 'añejados' edition offering a particularly rich final third of flavour.

This cigar - 'Cuban Glory Gold Medal No 4' in English - is one of the last of a disappearing breed, the premium hand-made long slender panetela. One might categorise panetelas into two groups, the more substantial ones in 34 to 39 ring gauges, and the now-rarer ones like this here, the 33-ring-gauge-or-less 'slenderellas' (as a now-discontinued Rafael González stick was named).

Tasting

It is first of all a lovely cigar, with a fine wrapper pleasing to the eye and touch, as befits the higher price. The extra 'aged habano' gold band helps balance out the appearance of this longer stick too, given it is the full 6-inch classic 'panetela extra'.

Pre-draw presents some pleasing caramel and spice notes. After lighting, one is immediately pleased with the distinctive and sweet La Gloria Cubana flavour palette, here starting with a sense of coffee and nuts, shortly to be complemented by some honey and light spice. Flavours are a bit subtle, it's good not to be drinking anything too heavy along with the cigar.

Draw with these skinny sticks is always a bit tight, tho I have never had a Gloria Cubana that was truly plugged. With these, I do tend to use a cigar-piercing tool to ease the draw, so as to more easily take in the very pleasant flavours here. One does need to be attentive and 'work' these thin hand-made sticks a bit to keep them lit & to keep the smoke flowing as freely as one would like.

What's very special in smoking this kind of slender panetela, is a curious sense that one can taste the inner structure, even how the tobacco leaves are 'folded' inside the wrapper. The wrapper is much more prominent with so much less filler volume, so the flavour balance strikes one bit differently when you are used to thicker sticks.

The middle third of this Médaille d'Or No 4, started with a bit of a cedar dominance at first, then the sweetness came back, with some delicious satisfying caramel hints. Working a bit to puff more, one can create some harshness. but it doesn't seem the fault of the cigar itself.

The ash on this skinny stick doesn't hold well, and tends to fall off in shorter chunks, sometimes after only a half-inch or so.

A few years of aging in this 2013 edition, has blended the flavours here well, and brought out the sweet notes a bit more. The aging benefits appear particularly strongly in the final third, where the flavours became much stronger and richer. There is cedar & sweet caramel & honey & light spice, and also some nice wood-fire aroma with nuttiness.

After those wonderful 'glorious' moments befitting the cigar, its thin frame caught up with it, and it became quite hard to keep the stick lit. Finally I had to give up approaching the nub, not because of harshness or bitterness but just because it was too much match-work.

The best comparison for a rival to this cigar, is the also-slender but shorter Cohiba Exquisitos, a hair under 5 inches (126mm) x 33 ring gauge. In general I would tilt toward the Exquisitos, for its easier draw and a richer, less delicate flavour, tho it doesn't have the unique and pleasing sweet notes of the Gloria Cubana. In this aged 2013 version, however, the final third of the Médaille d'Or No 4 did rival the flavour richness of the Cohiba for some minutes.

However, I rather understand why these super-slender cigars are fading away. Tho partial to slender cigars myself, I don't see a reason for cigars less than 34 ring gauge in fully hand-rolled sticks; anything thinner, and hand-rolled cigars are just a bit too 'light', and it often takes more work to enjoy them.

By contrast, the 30 to 33 ring gauges seem more well-suited to short-filler cigars, such as the quality Dutch machine-made stogies that use a Brazil-Cuban-Indonesian tobacco mix. In machine production, the slender format seems to give a better balance, whilst the machine process tends to guarantee an open, easy draw, whilst thicker machine cigars can be rougher or duller.

It's curious to note how much less tobacco you burn with a thinner cigar; ring gauge is far more important than length for tobacco volume. If you use your high school math and calculate - and subtract a bit for the final inch and a half nub you might not smoke - you can see that a 6-inch (152mm), 32-ring-gauge cigar like this, burns about the same amount of tobacco as a Reyes vitola, 40 ring gauge and only 4 1/3 (110mm) inches long.

La Gloria Cubana is another one of a group of the lesser-known 27 Habanos brands, which only have 1 or 2 or 3 cigars left in production, which raises another interesting issue. According to legend, it was Zino Davidoff himself who persuaded Fidel Castro not to scrap the old traditional Cuban cigar brand names. That was certainly fine for marques such as Montecristo and Hoyo de Monterrey, but for the 'marginal' brands this is now a problem in a world where shops focus on the few 'big brands' and often don't stock a La Gloria Cubana or Sancho Panza or Quai d'Orsay from Cuba.

We are thus in danger of losing some of the special flavour palettes amongst Cuban cigars. It might be time for Habanos s.a. to consolidate its 'endangered species' cigars into one or two new 'Vintage Cuban' brands. I'd like to see La Gloria Cubana re-do these sweet tobaccos in a slightly different format, maybe something like 36 ring gauge and 5 1/4" (133mm).

As a final fun note on the world of panetelas, here a short two-minutes-plus video clip of 4 wonderful vintage television cigar commercials, classics from North America where Edie Adams sang the 'Hey Big Spender!' tune. Note in the first two clips which show 5 sophisticated gentlemen smoking stogies, the vitola format selected for them is, like the Gloria Cubana Médaille d'Or here, a 6-inch panetela. And the other two clips (click here) seem to be where I'd see other Cigar Inspector readers -

You might be interested in these articles too:

Cigar Review – La Gloria Cuban Medaille d’Or No.4

Post from CigarInspector.com

CigarStash.com - the ultimate cigars shopping tool!

]]>
0
Andre Dias <![CDATA[Cigar Review – Wong Kwong Guocui Cigars – Crown (The Quintessence) (王冠國粹) (National Essence)]]> http://www.cigarinspector.com/?p=18001 2017-11-06T08:55:12Z 2017-11-06T08:54:12Z Origin : China Gifted by William Kilander, President of the Swedish Cigar Federation. Little info about the cigar before we begin, since this is only available in China at the moment it was very hard to find any info on it even the name of it. But what I can find this a collaboration between […]

Cigar Review – Wong Kwong Guocui Cigars – Crown (The Quintessence) (王冠國粹) (National Essence)

Post from CigarInspector.com

CigarStash.com - the ultimate cigars shopping tool!

]]>

Origin : China

Gifted by William Kilander, President of the Swedish Cigar Federation.

Little info about the cigar before we begin, since this is only available in China at the moment it was very hard to find any info on it even the name of it. But what I can find this a collaboration between Anhui Tobacco and Scandinavian Tobacco Group that started back in 2011.
I can't really find any info if all the tobacco is from China or if it's a mix. I'm still searching and will update the review upon getting the info.
Anyhow the cigar was made to commemorate Chinese nation drama - Peking Opera. Qing Emperor Qianlong, "the four emblem classes into Beijing", the integration of various artistic achievements of opera, the birth of Peking Opera.
The band on the cigar represents a classic mask used at the Chinese Opera.

Tasting

Location: This review was made outdoors, during an chilly afternoon, it was a little windy and it was 9°C.

Wrapper: Light orange brown, silky smooth with tiny veins.

Construction: Firm but still with some good feel to it.

Cold draw: Mainly it was a hay flavor.

1st third: Honey, lavender or a floral note overall and sandalwood. The flavors are very smooth and light to the touch of the tongue.
There is a very slight bitterness to the lips but nothing to dramatic.

2nd third: Very smooth, the floral notes dances on the tongue. It's similar to an Japanese whisky with the sweetness from honey and flowers.

The burn: Burns well balanced, gray-ish in color and very impressive how stable it is.

Smoke: Light in texture and brings a medium heat.

3rd third: Slight hint of cacao appears, otherwise the flavors keeps the same.

Conclusion: This was an unexpected cigar, I really hope this hits the European market. Great flavors, right up my alley. But remember this is a lighter cigar.

Result: In my book this is an 92 point cigar.

/Cigarmaster André

You might be interested in these articles too:

Cigar Review – Wong Kwong Guocui Cigars – Crown (The Quintessence) (王冠國粹) (National Essence)

Post from CigarInspector.com

CigarStash.com - the ultimate cigars shopping tool!

]]>
1
Manu <![CDATA[Cigar Review – Cohiba Talisman 2017 Limited Edition]]> http://www.cigarinspector.com/?p=17996 2017-10-24T11:00:14Z 2017-10-24T11:00:14Z Origin : Cuba Format : Canonazo Doble Size : 154mm x 21.4mm | 6" x 54 Released : 2017 Limited edition Hand-Made Price : $40+More info about purchasing Cohiba cigars... Draw : 5.5 out of 6 stars Burn : 5 out of 6 stars Flavour : 4.5 out of 6 stars Aroma : 5 out […]

Cigar Review – Cohiba Talisman 2017 Limited Edition

Post from CigarInspector.com

CigarStash.com - the ultimate cigars shopping tool!

]]>

Origin : Cuba
Format : Canonazo DobleCohiba
Size : 154mm x 21.4mm | 6" x 54
Released : 2017 Limited edition
Hand-Made
Price : $40+
More info about purchasing Cohiba cigars...

Draw : 5.5 out of 6 stars
Burn : 5 out of 6 stars
Flavour : 4.5 out of 6 stars
Aroma : 5 out of 6 stars
Strength : 4.5 out of 6 stars

I was very fortunate to crack one box of the awaited Habanos 2017 Limited edition: the Cohiba Talisman.
We have seen many of these cigars on the different social medias even though the launch event is on the 8th of November in London. Hunters and Frankau, the UK distributor of Habanos, got the opportunity to organise the official launch. That said we should all get worried about any Talisman around on the grey markets.
If I decided to write a review about this unofficial release, it is because I am 100% sure about the provenance of the box and we were few from the industry around the table to have the chance to taste it.

Tasting

The Cohiba Talisman comes in a varnished slid lid box of 10 cigars. One thing which is interesting to notice on the box is the stamp on the back of the box. We are all used to see the "hecho a Mano" and the factory code being placed in the middle of the back of the box. Because of all the new health warning taking more and more space on the boxes, the stamps are now located on the bottom so even the biggest health warning should not be covering these precious information.
The Cohiba Talisman is the very first limited edition being produced in the mythical factory of El Laguito.
This said, the construction of all the cigars from our box was impressive. The way it should be. Packed of tobacco with a very nice pre draw.

First Third

The first puff strikes me with the amount of smoke it develops and the the great draw. The flavours are fresh and vegetal and the aroma incredible, reminding me of a young cedar wood you would burn.
The burn remains perfectly constant all the way. The intensity of the blend is taking over the palate with a nice acidity and a long finish.
Towards the end of this first third a lot of nutty style sweetness develops. Very much a Chiba like flavours already. A slight bitterness appears.

Second Third
There is nothing to be mentioned regarding the construction. The draw and the burn are close to perfection. A great pyramid appears when you tap the long standing grey ash.
The flavours are very nutty and earthy. High intensity of in the blend like before. It doesn't increase, the bend is well balanced in strength.
A nice grassy finish takes over the palate and still this wonderful aroma is very pleasant.
The flavours are really opening and I could not believe the sweetness the cigar developed... This is not what I was expecting for a fresh cigar. Already great to smoke. Strength is medium to full and the flavours are complex expressing many different version of the cigar.

Final Third
Very big development from the fresh vegetal beginning to the marzipan long finish in the palate. I was far away from expecting such a delicious cigar already. A true cohiba which reminded me why we love this brand so much even though the price point is very high.

That said a new question comes to my mind. If it is already that delicious, how will it age?

You might be interested in these articles too:

Cigar Review – Cohiba Talisman 2017 Limited Edition

Post from CigarInspector.com

CigarStash.com - the ultimate cigars shopping tool!

]]>
15
Beneluxor <![CDATA[Cigar Review – Bolivar Corona Junior]]> http://www.cigarinspector.com/?p=17992 2017-10-18T12:26:40Z 2017-10-16T18:35:57Z Origin : Cuba Format : Minutos Size : 110 x 16,67 mm (4 1/3" x 42) Hand-Made Price : ~$7.9 eachMore info about purchasing Bolivar cigars... Draw : 5 out of 6 stars Burn : 4 out of 6 stars Flavour : 3 out of 6 stars Aroma : 4 out of 6 stars Strength […]

Cigar Review – Bolivar Corona Junior

Post from CigarInspector.com

CigarStash.com - the ultimate cigars shopping tool!

]]>

Origin : Cuba
Format : Minutos Bolivar
Size : 110 x 16,67 mm (4 1/3" x 42)
Hand-Made
Price : ~$7.9 each
More info about purchasing Bolivar cigars...

Draw : 5 out of 6 stars
Burn : 4 out of 6 stars
Flavour : 3 out of 6 stars
Aroma : 4 out of 6 stars
Strength : 5 out of 6 stars

Tasting

The Bolivar Corona Junior Minuto is a modest-mid-price, short-smoke, somewhat heady Cuban, offering unique Bolivar flavours including a kind of 'barbecue' & roasted chestnut, tho at times with some dull spots, so perhaps not the equal of the similar size & price Cuban Ramón Allones Small Club Corona.

This short Bolivar is one of three in the same Minutos vitola in what Habanos describes as its 'full flavour strength' category, along with the Ramón Allones Small Club & the Partagás Shorts. The Bolivar is, however, noticeably milder than the take-no-prisoners Partagás, and perhaps slightly less strong than the Ramón Allones.

Amongst Cubans I have a soft spot for Bolivar, given they uniquely make cigars in two of my favourite sizes, the short corona as here, plus a nowadays-rare hand-rolled medium-long panetela, the Bolivar No 3 (125mm x 34).

Bolivars have a distinctive flavour palette, and amidst the Bolivar expierience is not only a very pleasing roasted chestnut sort of flavour and aroma, but a very striking 'barbecue' kind of meaty flavour that is particularly Bolivar. Those unique flavours are why I can't resist picking up these small-format Bolivars every now & then.

The Bolivar Corona Junior seems to have particularly good construction in the exemplars I've tried over time, without the tight draw so common in small-format Cubans, never needing my cigar-piercing tool. Burn is usually quite nice. The one pictured here had a brief 'canoe' hollow during the burn but nothing serious. The wrapper is often nicely oily, if not always super-pretty.

Smoking experience is sometimes a bit uneven, with flat patches mixed with flavour bursts. At moments a Bolivar can have a beautiful aroma that is just not reflected in the taste. The one here in the photo started out pleasingly nutty, then grew quite flat to the degree I began to think 'What am I smoking here?' The middle third, however, opened with majestic flavour explosions, some of the roasted chestnut along with woody and earthy notes, and the famous 'Bolivar barbecue' was not missing, I almost opened a bag of paprika crisps.

The final third got a bit flat again, where you have the sense of smoking a slightly heady cigar but just not enough flavour to match the strength. This led me to recall my opinion that the also-heady Ramón Allones Small Club is the preferred cigar in this vitola, with its chocolate-like evocations and more consistent flavour interest.

For a slow puffer like myself, the methodically-burning Bolivar Junior short corona is about a 35 minute smoke, maybe around 25 minutes for the average stogie person, or a bit less than 20 minutes for heavier puffers.

One might say a word here about the names of these cigars and vitolas in Spanish & English, which can be confusing due to the singular / plural forms. Is this vitola 'Minutos' or 'Minuto'?

On the Habanos website, they tend to list both cigar names and the vitola category in plural form - 'Coronas', 'Robustos' - whereas in English we would tend to use the singular. The Bolivar cigar in this review is listed by Habanos as the 'Coronas Junior', and the vitola as well is listed as 'Minutos', though if your shop has the machine-made Guantánamera Minutos tubos from Cuba, you might see the tube with 'Minuto' in the singular printed on it.

In English we tend to copy the Cuban plural form when citing the cigars, except in cases like 'corona' or 'robusto' where we already generally use the singular. A less-common Cuban cigar word such as 'Minutos' might more often appear in plural. In short, both forms are ok, hence the apparent confusion.

You might be interested in these articles too:

Cigar Review – Bolivar Corona Junior

Post from CigarInspector.com

CigarStash.com - the ultimate cigars shopping tool!

]]>
0
Neil <![CDATA[Cigar Review – CAO Brazilia Gol Brazilian Robusto]]> http://www.cigarinspector.com/?p=17987 2017-10-16T13:30:46Z 2017-10-16T13:29:46Z Origin : Nicaragua Format : Robusto Size : 56x5 Wrapper : Brazil Filler : Nicaragua Binder : Nicaragua Hand-Made Price : ~$6 eachMore info about purchasing CAO Flathead... Draw : 2 out of 6 stars Burn : 6 out of 6 stars Flavour : 3 out of 6 stars Aroma : 4 out of 6 […]

Cigar Review – CAO Brazilia Gol Brazilian Robusto

Post from CigarInspector.com

CigarStash.com - the ultimate cigars shopping tool!

]]>

Origin : Nicaragua
CAO CigarsFormat : Robusto
Size : 56x5
Wrapper : Brazil
Filler : Nicaragua
Binder : Nicaragua
Hand-Made
Price : ~$6 each
More info about purchasing CAO Flathead...

Draw : 2 out of 6 stars
Burn : 6 out of 6 stars
Flavour : 3 out of 6 stars
Aroma : 4 out of 6 stars
Strength : 2 out of 6 stars

Tasting
CAO Brazilia 5x56 from a 4-pack sampler. The MX2 from this sampler did not impress, so nothing but higher hopes for the Brazilia. Outside smell is musty earth. Cut end presents cream. Wrapper is dark brown, slightly toothy, tight, invisible seams. Filler is a little lighter than the wrapper. Pack is firm. First tastes - we're off to a good start. It's woody, meaty, tart with a touch of sweetness. Nice flavors. Not quite rich but it's early days into this stick. There is the tiniest bit of spice leftover on the linger and the finish is short. Draw is snug but not troublesome. Burn seems slow but there is a steady amount of smoke coming off the foot. Burnline is decent.

First third down - flavor profile is unchanged. The ash however is changing color. It starts grey but turns brown. Thought it was a trick of the light but no. First ash held to nearly halfway. I would scale the flavor and body at the high end of medium. Some reviewers of earlier vintages reported nut and chocolate notes, but I don't get that. It's still mostly woody with raisiny dried fruit notes, especially in the offsmoke. This is its most redeeming flavor quality but it's good.

Past halfway and it's smoking just fine. An hour in and reaching the final third. Flavor profile is the same, just more cooked. Not really getting any strength, which is a good thing for me. Down to the last inch and there is more ash than cigar, which speaks well for the construction. If anything, the taste has mellowed, no bitterness, not over-charred. The cap is starting to fall apart but that's to be expected this far along It's about to be too hot to hold so kudos for being good to the end. 1.5 hours smoke time

You might be interested in these articles too:

Cigar Review – CAO Brazilia Gol Brazilian Robusto

Post from CigarInspector.com

CigarStash.com - the ultimate cigars shopping tool!

]]>
1
Andre Dias <![CDATA[Cigar Review – Bespoke Cigars Club Mareva Spalato Limited Edition 2017]]> http://www.cigarinspector.com/?p=17980 2017-10-07T09:49:54Z 2017-10-07T09:43:37Z Origin : Dominican Rep & Nicaragua Format : Pyramide Size : 50 x 5,5" Hand-Made Price : ~Euro12+ each Limited to 650 boxes, with 15 Cigars in each box. Tasting Location: This review was made indoors in a cigar lounge. Wrapper: Milk chocolate in colour, smooth and oily but with a slight rough texture of […]

Cigar Review – Bespoke Cigars Club Mareva Spalato Limited Edition 2017

Post from CigarInspector.com

CigarStash.com - the ultimate cigars shopping tool!

]]>

Origin : Dominican Rep & Nicaragua
Format : Pyramide
Size : 50 x 5,5"
Hand-Made
Price : ~Euro12+ each

Limited to 650 boxes, with 15 Cigars in each box.

Tasting

Location: This review was made indoors in a cigar lounge.

Wrapper: Milk chocolate in colour, smooth and oily but with a slight rough texture of the veins.

Construction: Firm even feel.

Cold draw: Hay and gingerbread.

1st third:
Milk chocolate, medium roasted coffee, pencil wood. It's like a sweet mild piece of wood, just resting in the mouth. It's so friendly, innocent and enjoyable.

2nd third:
A slight peppery sting in the middle of the tounge. The flavours keeps steady from previous part.
It's like a wooden straw dipped in a cup of Wiener Melange. Very interesting, so creamy and smooth.

The burn: Burns steady, sharp and the ash is white and firm.

Smoke: Voluminous, light to the touch and cool.

3rd third:
A little sting of the pepper on the lips, but still very enjoyable as before.

Conclusion:
This is one of my absolute favourite smokes of all time. So suave, creamy and perfect. This is ranked highly in my book. Unique flavours, you don't need a coffee to make it any better it's perfect as it is.

Result: In my book this is a 97 point cigar. Because for me this is not found anywhere else. Unique.

/Cigarmaster André

Cigar Review – Bespoke Cigars Club Mareva Spalato Limited Edition 2017

Post from CigarInspector.com

CigarStash.com - the ultimate cigars shopping tool!

]]>
0
Neil <![CDATA[Cigar Review – My Father Le Bijou 1922 Torpedo]]> http://www.cigarinspector.com/?p=17978 2017-10-02T10:33:48Z 2017-10-02T10:29:35Z Origin : Nicaragua Format : Torpedo Size : 6 1/8 x 52 Wrapper : Nicaragua Sun Grown Filler : Nicaragua Binder : Nicaragua Hand-Made Price : $11.5 each Initial aroma and cold draw notes are cream and cocoa. Wrapper is dark brown, Maduro, wrinkled is spots, firm even pack. Filler is medium and dark brown. […]

Cigar Review – My Father Le Bijou 1922 Torpedo

Post from CigarInspector.com

CigarStash.com - the ultimate cigars shopping tool!

]]>

Origin : NicaraguaMy Father Cigars
Format : Torpedo
Size : 6 1/8 x 52
Wrapper : Nicaragua Sun Grown
Filler : Nicaragua
Binder : Nicaragua
Hand-Made
Price : $11.5 each

Initial aroma and cold draw notes are cream and cocoa.
Wrapper is dark brown, Maduro, wrinkled is spots, firm even pack. Filler is medium and dark brown.

An inadvertent retrohale on the first puff assaulted my sinuses with pepper. After recovering from that and getting a few draws in, it is as if someone put black pepper in my cup of French Roast coffee and cream. Half inch in and the pepper is relegated to the finish with full-bodied coffee and cream in the foreground.

One inch in and development continues with sweet, tart, and dry components that I best know as raisins. Draw is perfect. Burnline is all but straight. Well into the first third, savory notes of meat, dried tomato, and red pepper are presenting themselves. Smoke output is just right, plenty on the draw with minimal, wasteful off-smoke. First ash held for 2-inches, just in time to remove the model band, which unfortunately claimed some wrapper, exposing a chunk of the lighter shade binder.

At halfway, the flavors have consolidated with nothing fighting for dominance. Pepper is subdued exposing a creamier mouth feel with more coffee in the aftertaste. The wrapper damage didn't affect the burn and the brand band came off cleanly. Strength is starting to show but my smoking pace is a bit anxious. Trying too hard to get action shot review pictures. Looking forward to enjoying one of these at a very relaxed pace, which I will, having bought a box of 23 at a good price of $180.

At the final third, flavor profile has contracted to a more tannic leather with a tinge of red pepper remaining on the tongue. It's still savory with a brightness like fresh tomato. On the flavor/body scale, both are nearly full. This cigar has a lot of presence, both on the draw and all the way in between puffs. Pepper never leaves the picture.

By the end of the last third, charred wood is taking over but a hint of the savory remains. No bitterness. Burn performance has been spot on, no touch-ups and no relights required. Managed 1 hour and 15 minutes at a quick pace. 10:00

You might be interested in these articles too:

Cigar Review – My Father Le Bijou 1922 Torpedo

Post from CigarInspector.com

CigarStash.com - the ultimate cigars shopping tool!

]]>
0
Beneluxor <![CDATA[Cigar Review – Montecristo Especial No.2]]> http://www.cigarinspector.com/?p=17969 2017-10-01T09:22:21Z 2017-09-19T11:02:38Z Origin : Cuba Size : 152 mm (6") x 15.08 mm Format : Laguito No 2 - Long Panetela Origin : Cuba Hand-Made Price : ~ € 12,90 / $ 15.40More info about purchasing Montecristo cigars... Draw : 4 out of 6 stars Burn : 3 out of 6 stars Flavour : 2 out of […]

Cigar Review – Montecristo Especial No.2

Post from CigarInspector.com

CigarStash.com - the ultimate cigars shopping tool!

]]>

MontecristoOrigin : Cuba
Size : 152 mm (6") x 15.08 mm
Format : Laguito No 2 - Long Panetela
Origin : Cuba
Hand-Made
Price : ~ € 12,90 / $ 15.40
More info about purchasing Montecristo cigars...

Draw : 4 out of 6 stars
Burn : 3 out of 6 stars
Flavour : 2 out of 6 stars
Aroma : 3 out of 6 stars
Aroma : 4 out of 6 stars

Tasting

An uneven cigar from Montecristo in the preferred vitola of some of the 20th century's most legendary stogie smokers, the Montecristo Especial No 2, despite rough edges, nonetheless gives you a long, truly Cuban smoking experience.

Would you like Comandante Fidel's personal favourite cigar at one-third off the price? If so, this is what Habanos itself can provide you. Indeed, this precise vitola here, was the personal favourite cigar type not only of Fidel Castro (1926-2016), but also of Zino Davidoff (1906-1994), and Zino's late partner & successor who orchestrated the post-Cuban Davidoff, Ernst Schneider (1922-2009). Fidel made it clear in interviews that the Cohiba version of this vitola, sold as the 'Coronas Especiales', was his personally preferred stick.

The Montecristo Especial No 2 is the least expensive of the now four in total, Cuban & Davidoff offerings of this vitola from which we can choose. In my local pricing, this Monte is about € 12,90, the Davidoff No 2 at about € 16,90, the Cohiba Coronas Especiales at about € 18,90, and the new dark-wrapper Davidoff 702 Series No 2 at about € 20,90.

Though not so currently fashionable in today's more 'Robusto' cigar era, there is much to be said for the long panetela cigar format, the 'panetela extra' as it was long called. Much like some in an earlier generation, I myself tend to feel the most elegant when handling a longer, slender cigar, though I feel this classic vitola is a bit too lengthy, with the long panetelas most attractive to me at about 120-140mm (4 3/4" to 5 1/2").

The panetela thickness - roughly 30 to 39 ring gauge - has a certain pleasantness in the mouth for some of us, plus the virtue that even a strongish long cigar that is slender, is never really overwhelming. You can combine serious flavour and strength in what yet remains to some degree a lighter smoke. It's also said that new smokers tend to more easily come to love cigars if their first dozen or so sticks are panetelas.

The downside of the panetela, is that the stick can overheat more easily if you puff & 'herf' too strongly, risking some loss of flavour and quality of experience. Another downside is that for hand-made cigars, it is more difficult for the torcedora cigar rollers to get a narrow cigar 'right' in terms of not being too tight or plugged, and this is a particular problem with thinner Cuban cigars, at times needing a saving poke with a cigar-piercing tool.

Tho in ease of draw, this Montecristo Especial No 2 has never been a major problem any time I have had one. The Monte Especial No 2 is, however, a bit of a rougher sibling to its 3 pricier sisters.

In looks this one in particular was not so smooth, with a bit of colour contrast on the pigtail cap. An older cigar at the shop, part of the pigtail fell off while handling it before lighting, tipping me off to how it had uneven storage at some point, showing further in the crumbling ash on the initial part of the cigar.

Pre-draw aroma was mild, but with a beautiful taste on the inhale, old forest with a bit of spice. After lighting there was a taste of walnut along with a burning wood fire, a bit of a harsh side showing itself, then it settled down after a few minutes to being a bit smoother and more nutty.

After the initial couple of centimetres of ash crumbled, the ash then held quite well, to 3cm or so, before falling off. The ash did however turn twisty with some funny big 'ears' at one point. Burn was fairly uneven, and a few touch-ups were required. A funny thing about this very long panetela, is that in early stages it takes much more effort to purge the cigar, which here was needed to stave off some incipient harshness.

The middle section after a good purge, got quite softly flavoured, though with some interesting roasted-chestnut tastes, followed by the flavour almost generally fading away. This stick had gotten a bit too mellow in its long sojourn in the store's humidor room. The final third of my hour with this cigar remained pleasant, though also unremarkable flavour-wise. There was a bit of nuttiness, bits of slight harshness, and moments of flavour just missing.

Toward the end, however, I realised I still had the involuntary smile on my face, the feeling of having smoked a decent Cuban cigar at length, a bit of that uniquely dreamy mental condition one associates with Cubans. I chuckled a bit thinking of another somewhat rough long Cuban panetela, the Por Larrañaga Montecarlos Deliciosos (33 x 159mm), often very crudely assembled but an enjoyable Cuban smoke & a terrific bargain, under € 6 when I've been able to find one.

For a refined cigar in this vitola, one would look to this Monte's sisters, either the Cohiba Coronas Especiales or the Davidoff No 2 ... but for its price the Montecristo Especiales No 2 has its place despite the rough edges and flavour fade. It struck me as a good long cigar to light when you have some big project, a long report to do or some numbers to crunch, and you just need to relax your mind with some Cuban tobacco whilst not worrying about the funny-looking ash ears at the end of your stogie.

You might be interested in these articles too:

Cigar Review – Montecristo Especial No.2

Post from CigarInspector.com

CigarStash.com - the ultimate cigars shopping tool!

]]>
2